A Feast for the Eyes, Ears, and Heart

44676146662_340d0ac3ee_kFor my yearly Back-to-School post, I would like to reflect on our family’s love for out loud reading. Good strength to all in your September return to learning. God bless your studies in this new school year!

It is not enough to love good books. It is not even enough to promote literacy among our youth. For what good is literacy if our exercise of reading is confined to the private, self-contained world of silent reading. Reading, especially to children, should be an event, an out-loud occasion for bonding around a shared narrative. Continue reading

A Life Worth Living

814wvha92ul-_sy445_How could a man who has lead such a noble and praiseworthy life be lead to attempt suicide multiple times toward the end of his life? The answer is not a simple one like he just did not know God or love enough people. The answer to his despair and the clue to his salvation comes from an extended community around him of which he was only slightly aware at first. The Swedish film A Man Called Ove touches the deepest heart of what it means to be human, especially for people who have grown old and no longer feel needed, useful, or loved. Continue reading

Hierarchical Visitations, New Ordinations, and the Establishment of a New Diocesan Monastery

Tuesday, August 15/28, 2018, Boston, MA
Feast of the Dormition of the Most Holy Mother of God

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It is an amazing gift that with the blessing of Patriarch Neofit and the blessing of the beloved Prelate of our diocese, Metropolitan Joseph, three Hierarchs, the Metropolitans Serafim of Nevrokop,  Grigorii of Vratsa, and Daniil of Vidin, together with Archimadrite Epifaniy came from Bulgaria to Boston to officiate the tonsuring and ordinations of our beloved Brothers in Christ from the parish of Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church in Boston, MA. Continue reading

Unity in Community

9dc1bce4f82242bfe9150bbb54f5d854Sunday, July 9/22, 2018
8th Sunday After Pentecost

1 Corinthians 1:10-18
Matthew 14:14-22

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen. Glory to Jesus Christ. Glory forever. What do you eagerly desire? Or what do you dream in the unguarded moments of sleep or the early moments of waking? In a new song from a recent children’s movie, a young man croons that there are a million dreams keeping him awake at night. And with the enthusiasm that is particular to youth, the song posits that those dreams lead to a world we’re gonna make. While we can sympathize with the young man’s thirst for life, we adults know that self-created worlds often leave a person unfulfilled in the multitude of their million dreams. Those self-created worlds don’t in the end unite us to one another and our precious creations crumble almost as soon as they are built. Continue reading

The Joy of Gazing With Our Eyes

blindmanSunday, April 30/May 13, 2018
Sunday of the Blind Man
St. Ignatius Brianchaninov
American Mother’s Day

Acts 16:16-34
John 9:1-38

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen. Christ is risen! Indeed He is risen! On this sixth and last Sunday of Pascha, let us take stock of all that we have witnessed in this season of the Resurrection. We are presented in this morning’s Gospel with a most awesome miracle, the healing of a man blind from birth, and we are invited to behold the resurrected Christ in one last and final image, as the Light of the World. These past six Sundays have been a banquet for the senses: In the second (first after Pascha), the disciple Thomas touched His living side; in the third, the myrrh bearing women heard the message of the angel; in the fourth, the paralytic felt the ability to walk again; and last Sunday (the fifth), a woman from Samaria tasted water that satisfied her thirst forever. On this sixth and final week, a man born blind sees Him Who is the Light of the World and he receives from him enlightenment of both body and soul. Through all of these wonderful proofs of his resurrection, our Lord has turned frightened fishermen into apostles, sinful women into bold evangelists, and blind and lame people into those who could see and walk. Continue reading

The Mystery of the Peanut

transcoderThe following is a guest post from a 10-year-old boy who is one of my classmates. This research project is the culmination of a year’s study in English grammar and writing styles that homeschoolers in Classical Conversations perform in grades 4-6.

George Washington Carver was the most popular black man in the late 1800’s. He was born in 1864. Although born into slavery, he became a world renowned scientist. He is often referred to as, “The Plant Doctor “, which began at only ten years old.  He learned from Creator God, which inspired his love for nature. He became a professor at the south’s famous black college, The Tuskegee Institute.  With all his diligence and honors he received, he is most famous for helping others for free. Continue reading

A Time Without Women Doctors

d70da3d956a666d42764a8b0bad845c8I bet you have met plenty of doctors in your life and a lot of of them were women. Well you may find this hard to believe but there was a time girls were not allowed to become doctors. Back in the 1800’s there were a lot of things women were not allowed to be. Women were only supposed to become mothers or wives or maybe teachers or seamstresses, being a doctor’s was definitely not a choice. What do you think changed all this?…or should I say who? Continue reading